Dubspot Instructor Spotlight: Jon Margulies (Hobotech, Tiny Machines) – Video Interview

This week, we shine some light on one of our treasured instructors, a ridiculously skillful and active producer, educator, and musician. Jon Margulies is a master at combining disparate musical genres and styles, and reshaping them to create something unlike anything else currently out there. As Hobotech, his long running one-man project nods to American roots music from the 1950s with heavy bass, dubstep, dancefloor-ready rhythms, and futurefunk. He also blends infectious electronic beats and synth melodies with well-crafted singer-songwriter vocal harmonies in the electropop trio Tiny Machines, which includes former Dubspot student and recording artist April White and singer-songwriter and guitarist Lydia Ooghe. As educator and writer, he’s well-known and highly regarded for writing the definitive user manual and comprehensive guide Ableton Live 8 Power!

3
  • Studio Monitor Advice Pt 1 – Dubspot Instructors Give Home Studio Speaker Tips | Dubspot Blog
  • 4/3/2012

[...] I’m all about the JBL LSR series these days. i’ve got a pair of the 4328s in NY and the 4326s in LA (cuz i’m in a smaller room). The room correction thing they do is pretty amazing…in NY where i’ve got higher ceilings and a bunch of bedroom junk in the room, they have a huge sweet spot with no additional room treatment. in LA, i’ve got a small boxy room without much stuff in it, so some additional bass trapping was necessary. i think lots of people starting out should spend a little less on monitors and get some good bass traps! – Jon Margulies [...]

  • Microphone Advice From The Dubspot Staff (Shure, AKG, Neumann, Mojave, Apogee) | Dubspot Blog
  • 4/3/2012

[...] I can’t say enough nice things about the Sure SM-7. It’s a $350 dynamic mic that many engineers with fancy mic collections still have and sometimes use for lead vocals, as well as for other typical dynamic mic tasks such as kick drum and guitar cabinet. (it was even used to record Michael Jackson’s vocals on “Thriller”). It doesn’t sound at all like a large diaphragm condenser (the most common type of vocal mic), but it records tracks that tend to sit extremely well in a dense mix, so it’s a good match for an electronic music producer. The other reason the SM-7 is a great mic for bedroom producers is that it’s highly directional and rejects most sound that isn’t directly in front of the mic. – Jon Margulies [...]

  • Studio Monitor Advice Pt 2: Placement + Understanding The Sound of Your Room | Dubspot Blog
  • 4/3/2012

[...] I’ve got a small boxy room without much stuff in it, so some additional bass trapping was necessary. I think lots of people starting out should spend a little less on monitors and get some good bass traps! – John Marguiles [...]